Venetian-Style Quebec Grain-Fed Veal Liver

Type of cut: variety meats

Yield: 4 servings

Degree of difficulty: easy

Preparation: 15 minutes

Cooking: 20 minutes

Cooking method: stir frying and sautéing

VDGQ-icon-classic-recipesEach recipe has a story!

It is difficult to determine the exact origin of each recipe. The story you will read is taken from legends, discussions and chefs’ theories. Apparently…

The origins of veal liver go back to the Roman era. Initially, the Romans cooked liver with figs to make the pronounced taste less strong. The Venetians took this recipe as a model and replaced the figs with onions. The first written traces of this recipe go back to 1790. The Venetians used sweet onions from the islands, in equal quantities with veal liver cut in small pieces.

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Ingredients

  • 500 g (1 lb) Quebec Grain-Fed Veal liver cut in 2-cm strips
  • 500 g (1 lb) onions cut in fine rings
  • 60 ml (1/4 cup) olive oil
  • 125 ml (1/2 cup) dry white wine
  • 125 ml (1/2 cup) prepared concentrated veal stock
  • 30 ml (2 tbsp) butter
  • 30 ml (2 tbsp) chopped parsley
  • 30 ml (2 tbsp) lemon juice
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation

Optional: before cooking, soak the veal liver strips in milk for a few minutes and wipe with paper towel.

  1. In a frying pan, on medium, heat butter and brown onions until tender. Set aside and keep warm.
  2. In the same frying pan, heat oil and cook veal liver strips until the meat juices rise to the surface. Turn and continue cooking until the meat juices rise once again to the surface. Cooking of the veal liver is completed when the internal temperature of the meat reaches 68 to 70°C (155 to 158°F) for a slightly pink meat. Set aside and keep warm.
  3. Deglaze frying pan with wine, add veal stock and bring to a boil.
  4. Place the onions and the liver strips in the preparation for 1 minute.
  5. Add parsley and lemon juice, mix well and serve with vegetables.

VDGQ-icone-chef Recipe provided by Alain Fortier, chef and training consultant for Quebec Grain-Fed Veal.